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odditiesoflife:

The Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye
The stunning rock formations caused by erosion from the crystal clear water running down from the Cullins, the largest mountains on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, created the legendary fairy pools. Glen Brittle, a large glen at the south of the isle, is where the pools can be found. The tributaries of the River Brittle run down the Cullins into the glen forming a beautiful stream with waterfalls known as the fairy pools. Because of the spacious glen, the mountains, and the stunning waterfalls and pools, the area is extremely popular with tourists, hikers and mountain bikers. 
source 1, 2, 3, 4
odditiesoflife:

The Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye
The stunning rock formations caused by erosion from the crystal clear water running down from the Cullins, the largest mountains on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, created the legendary fairy pools. Glen Brittle, a large glen at the south of the isle, is where the pools can be found. The tributaries of the River Brittle run down the Cullins into the glen forming a beautiful stream with waterfalls known as the fairy pools. Because of the spacious glen, the mountains, and the stunning waterfalls and pools, the area is extremely popular with tourists, hikers and mountain bikers. 
source 1, 2, 3, 4
odditiesoflife:

The Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye
The stunning rock formations caused by erosion from the crystal clear water running down from the Cullins, the largest mountains on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, created the legendary fairy pools. Glen Brittle, a large glen at the south of the isle, is where the pools can be found. The tributaries of the River Brittle run down the Cullins into the glen forming a beautiful stream with waterfalls known as the fairy pools. Because of the spacious glen, the mountains, and the stunning waterfalls and pools, the area is extremely popular with tourists, hikers and mountain bikers. 
source 1, 2, 3, 4
odditiesoflife:

The Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye
The stunning rock formations caused by erosion from the crystal clear water running down from the Cullins, the largest mountains on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, created the legendary fairy pools. Glen Brittle, a large glen at the south of the isle, is where the pools can be found. The tributaries of the River Brittle run down the Cullins into the glen forming a beautiful stream with waterfalls known as the fairy pools. Because of the spacious glen, the mountains, and the stunning waterfalls and pools, the area is extremely popular with tourists, hikers and mountain bikers. 
source 1, 2, 3, 4

odditiesoflife:

The Fairy Pools on the Isle of Skye

The stunning rock formations caused by erosion from the crystal clear water running down from the Cullins, the largest mountains on the Isle of Skye in Scotland, created the legendary fairy pools. Glen Brittle, a large glen at the south of the isle, is where the pools can be found. The tributaries of the River Brittle run down the Cullins into the glen forming a beautiful stream with waterfalls known as the fairy pools. Because of the spacious glen, the mountains, and the stunning waterfalls and pools, the area is extremely popular with tourists, hikers and mountain bikers. 

source 1, 2, 3, 4

odditiesoflife:

Stunning Landscape - Cappadocia, Turkey
The mysterious rock formations and underground cities of Cappadocia make this region of Turkey one the most beautiful in the world. The rich history of this site can be told through the villages, subterranean churches and fortresses that have been carved straight into the soft, porous, eerily eroded rock. Popular activities in the region include visits to the underground cities, viewing the ancient Christian cave art, seeing the “fairy chimney” rock formations, and taking sunrise hot air balloon rides for a view of the breathtaking landscape from above.
odditiesoflife:

Stunning Landscape - Cappadocia, Turkey
The mysterious rock formations and underground cities of Cappadocia make this region of Turkey one the most beautiful in the world. The rich history of this site can be told through the villages, subterranean churches and fortresses that have been carved straight into the soft, porous, eerily eroded rock. Popular activities in the region include visits to the underground cities, viewing the ancient Christian cave art, seeing the “fairy chimney” rock formations, and taking sunrise hot air balloon rides for a view of the breathtaking landscape from above.
odditiesoflife:

Stunning Landscape - Cappadocia, Turkey
The mysterious rock formations and underground cities of Cappadocia make this region of Turkey one the most beautiful in the world. The rich history of this site can be told through the villages, subterranean churches and fortresses that have been carved straight into the soft, porous, eerily eroded rock. Popular activities in the region include visits to the underground cities, viewing the ancient Christian cave art, seeing the “fairy chimney” rock formations, and taking sunrise hot air balloon rides for a view of the breathtaking landscape from above.
odditiesoflife:

Stunning Landscape - Cappadocia, Turkey
The mysterious rock formations and underground cities of Cappadocia make this region of Turkey one the most beautiful in the world. The rich history of this site can be told through the villages, subterranean churches and fortresses that have been carved straight into the soft, porous, eerily eroded rock. Popular activities in the region include visits to the underground cities, viewing the ancient Christian cave art, seeing the “fairy chimney” rock formations, and taking sunrise hot air balloon rides for a view of the breathtaking landscape from above.
odditiesoflife:

Stunning Landscape - Cappadocia, Turkey
The mysterious rock formations and underground cities of Cappadocia make this region of Turkey one the most beautiful in the world. The rich history of this site can be told through the villages, subterranean churches and fortresses that have been carved straight into the soft, porous, eerily eroded rock. Popular activities in the region include visits to the underground cities, viewing the ancient Christian cave art, seeing the “fairy chimney” rock formations, and taking sunrise hot air balloon rides for a view of the breathtaking landscape from above.

odditiesoflife:

Stunning Landscape - Cappadocia, Turkey

The mysterious rock formations and underground cities of Cappadocia make this region of Turkey one the most beautiful in the world. The rich history of this site can be told through the villages, subterranean churches and fortresses that have been carved straight into the soft, porous, eerily eroded rock.

Popular activities in the region include visits to the underground cities, viewing the ancient Christian cave art, seeing the “fairy chimney” rock formations, and taking sunrise hot air balloon rides for a view of the breathtaking landscape from above.

asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks
Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook
"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." "When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks
Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook
"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." "When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks
Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook
"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." "When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks
Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook
"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." "When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks
Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook
"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." "When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."
asylum-art:

asylum-art:
Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks
Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook
"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." "When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."

asylum-art:

asylum-art:

Realistic Paintings by Alyssa Monks

Artist on Tumblr, on Facebook

"Using filters such as glass, vinyl, water, and steam, I distort the body in shallow painted spaces. These filters allow for large areas of abstract design - islands of color with activated surfaces - while bits of the human form peak through. In a contemporary take on the traditional bathing women, my subjects are pushing against the glass “window”, distorting their own body, aware of and commanding the proverbial male gaze. Thick paint strokes in delicate color relationships are pushed and pulled to imitate glass, steam, water and flesh from a distance. However, up close, the delicious physical properties of oil paint are apparent. Thus sustaining the moment when abstract paint strokes become something else." 

"When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet - if both can coexist in the same moment."

asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney
Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.


Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.


The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.





A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals. Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.




watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney

Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.

Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.

The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.

A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals.
Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.

watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.
asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.

asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.

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